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WATER - REQUIREMENTS DURING EXERCISE

 

Loss of Body Water During Exercise

During exercise our muscles use ATP energy. Only 25% of this energy is used by the muscle; the other 75% is released as heat. Heat from the working muscles is transferred to the blood. The blood flow to the skin is increased, and the heat is lost through evaporation - sweating. Sweat comes from the water in your blood; you need to replace this fluid or you'll become dehydrated.

 

Water Needs During Exercise

On average, the human body has 2.5 million sweat glands. The more you sweat during exercise, the more fluid you lose and the more you need to drink. How much water you need during exercise depends upon:

  1. Your natural tendency to sweat - some people naturally sweat more than others.
  2. How fit you are - the fitter you are, the more effectively you keep your body cool - so the more you sweat.
  3. Training Intensity - Training harder and longer
  4. Training Ambient Environment - hotter and more humid surroundings, will also make you sweat more.

Water Purifiers

 

Estimating Your Water Requirements During Exercise

How much water you should consume during exercise can be estimated by either:

  • Simple Calculation - Average loss = one litre of fluid for each hour we exercise.
  • Weight Check - Weigh yourself before and after exercise. Each kg of body weight loss is equivalent to a litre of fluid loss. Drink 1.5 litres of fluid for every kg of weight lost. [You'll lose further fluid as urine]
  • Urine Check - Another way is to check your urine: if it's pale and plentiful you're well-hydrated; if it's dark and in short supply you'd better start drinking!

 

Impact of Water on Exercise Performance.

A loss of 2% of your body weight [1.4kg if you weigh 70kg] - will affect your ability to exercise. There' is a 5% drop in performance for every 1% loss in body weight.

Exercising without replacing the fluid lost, will lead to dehydrated. This affects your bodys ability to keep cool, your body temperature will start to rise, you'll begin to feel nauseous and lightheaded, ending up with fatigue or heat stroke.

 

When to Take Water During Exercise

Water should be consumed before, during and after exercise.

  • Before - Drink 300 to 500ml of fluid in the 15 minutes prior to your workout.
  • During exercise - drink 150 to 250ml every 15 minutes to offset fluid losses.
  • After exercise – drink at least 500ml or more, according to the calculations you make based on all exercise factors.

 

When Sports Drinks Are Better Than Water

If you are exercising at a low to moderate intensity for less than an hour, water is great.

If you have been sweating very heavily for more than one hour, a sports drink containing sodium will prevent a drop in your blood sodium levels (hyponatraemia), and speed up fluid absorption. Most sports drinks generally contain 5 to 8g of carbohydrate in every 100ml. This makes them 'isotonic' - a similar concentration to blood - and therefore quickly absorbed. The added carbohydrates also provide the vital glucose to help avoid fatigue.

 

Alcohol and Exercise

Do not drink alcohol just before exercise and avoid it afterwards until you have properly re-hydrated. Alcohol before exercise effects coordination skills and exercise performance, increasing the risk of injury. Alcohol can also cause dehydration and slow recovery from injury.

Water Purifiers

Learn more about water filtration systems.

NEXT: Fat Burning Diet


 

 

 
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